Henri Duparc – Lénore

Henri Duparc – Lénore

Henri Duparc studied piano with César Franck and became one of his first composition students; in 1888 Franck dedicated his Symphony in D minor to him. In 1870 he took part in the Franco-Prussian War and the following year, on 9 November 1871, he married the Scottish...
Hans von Bülow – Nirvana

Hans von Bülow – Nirvana

Legendary conductor Hans von Bülow, considered by Wagner the only one who could conduct his operas, was also a virtuoso pianist and a composer. As one of the most distinguished conductors of the 19th century, his activity was critical for establishing the successes of...
Alexander Borodin – Requiem

Alexander Borodin – Requiem

This piece, quite curiously, began in 1879 as a musical joke based on the a children’s tune called “Tati-tati” (aka “Chopsticks”). On this little theme Borodin creates a 5 minutes piece on the text of the Requiem aeternam. The great...
Vítězslav Novák – In the Tatra Mountains

Vítězslav Novák – In the Tatra Mountains

Vítězslav Novák (1870-1949) was a Czech post-romantic composer. Born in a small Bohemian town, he moved to Prague in his teens to study at the conservatory, where he had the good fortune of having Antonín Dvořák as a teacher for some time.  In the late 1890s, Novák...
Vasily Kalinnikov – Symphony n.1

Vasily Kalinnikov – Symphony n.1

Vasily Kalinnikov (1866-1901) has not been one of the most prolific composers in history. In 1892, thanks to Tchaikovsky, Kalinnikov became the main conductor of the Maly Theater, and later that same year of the Moscow Italian Theater, a position he eventually was...
Havergal Brian – Symphony n.1 “Gothic”

Havergal Brian – Symphony n.1 “Gothic”

Havergal Brian (born William Brian, 1876–1972) was an extremely prolific British classical composer.  His First Symphony (out of 32), written between 1919 and 1927 and known as the “Gothic” symphony, is to this day his most famous work. It needs to be said...

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